Genre: Avant – Garde Black Metal
Country: France
Label: Norma Evangelium Diaboli
Year: 2016

Deathspell Omega have managed to equate their name with the “revolutionary” new generation of Black Metal (allow me please to use this phrase) and rightly so of course, considering the gravestones they have been releasing over the last two decades. After about six years of complete silence on full lengths (the compilations, the boxsets and the EPs kept us good company, of course, to be frank) Deathspell Omega released the album “The Synarchy of Molten Bones”. It was only fair for a paroxysm to break out amidst the extreme metal cycles and for a certain hype to be caused, without ‘hype’ having a negative connotation. Other glorified it, others were disappointed, others were indifferent, others were passionate about it. I decided to keep a little distance and to re-visit the album some time after, for a more objective opinion deposit, and that’s what actually happened.

Revisiting the record when spirits were calmer, I realized that Deathspell Omega opened a new door on their way. They took the next step. Perhaps they’re changing eras. Maybe it was about time. They got a bit adventurous with their compositions; they “experimented” a little more than usual, producing an extremely chaotic music that demands many hearings to be understood. You’ll tell me that the existence of an anarchic mess in the compositions does not automatically mean that the music is well written or that their exponential character spreads a veil of admiration that can disorient you. However, after repeated hearings, the aforementioned statements were contradicted and my faith in the group was vindicated.

“The Synarchy of Molten Bones” is characterized by excessive technicalities, almost unimaginable speeds, small breaks in the paces, enough for a small break to rush in and let you catch your breath. We could say that “paranoia” and “chaos” are the two most appropriate words that can verbally translate the music offered by Deathspell Omega. We’re dealing with a passionate release. It’s not purely occult, however it’s extremely violent, primitive, aggressive, dangerous. It makes you feel like you’re in the middle of a maze, with nothing left to hold on to.

What makes “The Synarchy of Molten Bones” stand out, beyond the purely musical part, it’s the atmosphere it creates. The cornerstone in this case is Mikko Aspa’s performance. I was impressed by his vocal management. The way he delivers the lyrics and with his personal style evident at all times, make the final result majestic. Mikko Aspa’s multilevel performance contributed greatly to the creation, building and establishment of the intensity of the stifling atmosphere created in “The Synarchy of Molten Bones”. The “metaphysical” satanism that’s “channeled” through the lyrics of course plays its own role in the whole atmosphere.

On the positive side we should include the excellent production of the record. During the first hearings, one would think that the compositions are so entangled that force the instruments to act the same way. Some hearings later, you realize that the same instruments are perfectly tied without overlapping one another. We are talking about an elaborate orchestra that acts like the gears of a clock. Each instrument contributes in its own way, as for example the (fantastic) bass that sounds crystal clear and gives the appropriate depth to the tracks. So, the mixing and mastering processes “eloquently” succeeded into appropriately bringing out every aspect of the album. It is terribly difficult to manage such perfection when the music you have in your hands has such a paranoid character, so kudos for that.

In conclusion, Deathspell Omega continuing the tradition they have on their backs, once again pushed themselves, indicating that the time is not an enemy, nor an excuse to go downhill. They searched their limits and with the uniqueness that characterizes them, they managed to convince me and many people to think that “The Synarchy of Molten Bones” is a very strong release and it’s rightfully found on many last year’s top records lists. It is a multifaceted album that should you let it embrace you, it will offer you a lot.

5/6