Genre: Progressive
Country: Norway
Label: InsideOut
Year:2017

Immediacy is the feature that has the first say in Norwegian’s Leprous’s fifth album. It would be a great oversight not to mention this from the beginning of a reciew for a record, which from its very first listening reveals to us almost all of its great virtues with every song: The completeness of the compositions (most of which you have already softly quoted in unsuspected moments, almost immediately after their first hearing). The dynamics and talent of an expressively liberated band. Also, the ace that has always been hidden in the sleeve of Leprous: that devilish way they use as means to convey to you all their notes, leaving you just with the desire to return to the album and listen to it again. You can just surrender yourself to the songs that one way or another focus on the captivating vocal melodies of Einar Solberg – and I really dare say that I often get the impression that these are the basis for building several Leprous tracks. But, you can start listening to what’s going on beneath the bark of each synthesis, and then you’ll understand that nothing here happened randomly and that under every -that fragile and stormy, almost silent and charged-point in each song, there’s one puzzle you are asked to decode if you want to see the other side of the Leprous coin. Then all the creators’ references to the Muse universe will be clearly displayed, and that familiar feeling of confidence or intimacy if you want to have it every time you hit your finger with the melody of a song Queen on the lips will be manifested. And that’s what you hummed first and then actually listened to it. Do you remember? You will certainly find more musical expressions to decode by listening; charming pop passages that don’t smell like the insides of a super market, a light jazz jargon that awaits you to carefully listen, Djent instant bursts, post-minimalist repetitions and more beautiful similar structures. Yes, the guitars are not as heavy as they were in the past. They break out where they should and learn to coexist in a whole that sounds mature and coherent. A set resulting from the in-point use of each instrument: Keys, samplers, vocal melodies, bass lines that bridge the overturns and an irreplaceable Baard Kolstad on the drums. All this want their place in each piece, and they have it. Listen and you will understand. Leprous on the most mature record of their career. Freed, expressive with a compact and direct effect, away from subtler not so eloquent ways of creating impressions. Music that’s charged, music that you want to hear again.

5/6