Genre: Heavy Metal/Doom
Country: U.S.A.
Label: High Roller Records
Year: 2017

If you recently came across the demo recordings of 1978/79 of Angel Witch, then surely this release should fit you. On the other hand, if you paid attention to Christian Mistress’ release two years ago, who established a breakthrough with their second album, then you should keep paying attention to this review (later on, you’ll see how these two bands are connected). Then again, those of you who like female vocals, especially when those are mixed with melancholic riffs in a vintage setting with the sound warmth of the ’70s, then you’re a bit late to check Quayde LaHüe. But let’s see who these guys with the strange name are… Their founder Reuben Storey had contributed to the Christian Mistress’ Possession album in 2015, which we mentioned above. Since then his mind was set to write new material. The many duties of Christian Mistress’ members forced Storey to turn to new members to record his ideas under a new name and band. So again with Jonny Wulf (as in CM, although he doesn’t play the bass this time – he’s handling guitars), Peter David Connelly (who changed his instrument and now plays drums instead of bass), himself in the bass (instead of drums), Tim Diedrich in the second guitars (yes, from Christian Mistress, which was something foreseeable, as the town they’re from is not overflowing with musicians, so it makes sense to have such alchemy and common faces) and Jenna Fitton, who was singing in a tribute band of Black Sabbath, created a five-piece act with clear music orientations. With a quite dark and rough sound, but with a lot of N.W.O.B.H.M. and Hard Rock of the 70s elements, Quayde LaHüe don’t move on hippie paths like Blues Pills or occult descenders like Jex Thoth but you can find common features with all of them. Although it is not a regular studio album (it contains 4 new tracks plus an adaptation of the track ‘Nightmare’ originally performed by Storm from May 2017 that only existed digitally under the title ‘Day of the Oppressor’ plus the 6 pieces of the 100-print cassette titled Quayde LaHüe, which was first released in December 2016, ‘Day Of The Oppressor’ works impeccably as a source of initiation to their music and prepares us for the band’s next step which is nothing less than a ‘normal’ studio album next year at chance. Until then…

4/6