It is very often a work of art to receive great acceptance by critics, audience and the Press as also being well treated by Time the ultimate judge and its creator feeling that he/she/they could have done it better or different than what they have offered us.  “Prayer of the Hunter” is a record that answers this situation. 40 years after its original release still the original members all these years but also in recent interviews talking about the album speak for “a rushed album”. They probably are right yet the album is brilliant.

In 1982 when Tank released it only few months later after their glorious debut “Filth Hounds Of Hades”, the world was hungry for N.W.O.B.H.M. and Tank. Of course music business was definitely working differently and groups were sooner in studio often during or between touring as labels were pushing the bands in order to keep their names hot in the market. Let me remind you that Judas Priest (10.02 “Stained Class” & 09.10. “Killing Machine”) in 1978 and Motörhead  (24.03 “Overkill” & 27.10 “Bomber”) the following year released two excellent, now considered to be classics records, in less than 12 months, so it was something that the fans were expecting from their heroes back then. 

Tank were in tour with Motörhead in Europe in 1981 before recording their first album and continued appearing as special guests for Motörhead on their tour in United Kingdom for “Iron Fist” in 1982. It is obvious that once again the material was heavily influenced by Lemmy’s gang. Even though Tank never actually gig on the songs or having many rehearsals the high quality of the compositions made the final result more than awesome. Truth be told the first mix of the recording were used to be printed on vinyl. Something that a big name just wouldn’t let it happen. Despite the “fast track” recording the LP is impressive. 

The opener is an instant classic. “Walking Barefoot Over Glass” has this simple riffing and chorus while the raspy vocals and the heavy lead bass that their fans love. “Pure Hatred” that follows is a mid-paced rocker that blows your mind. The bass line is thick and in a playful mood. All songs are based on hot rocking riffs and Algy’s punkish attitude (had a glorious punk past Algy as he was ex-The Damned and ex-The Saints) and hoarse vocals. A’ side also has “Biting and Scratching” with its blues based guitars solos, “Some Came Running” with its catchy knock throughrst6hyryhryhrfdxdggf and the sloppy chorus and the instrumental T.A.N.K. with the double-bass kick drum rhythm and the excellent soloing guitars.

The B’ side starts again with a great song “Used Leather (Hanging Loose)” where things are filthy and wild. Their label, Kamaflage Records picked The Osmonds cover on “Crazy Horses”, a song that the band used to perform among a dozen of songs in order to jam and somehow Kamaflage found the recording and used it! Strange enough too that their audience back then took the lyrics of the song and thought that they were singing about heroin, while the song talks actually about the environment pollution and the “wild horses” are flying cars that 40 years ago humanity believed would be the future vehicle. In 2022 though humanity has Flat Earth issues…and anti-vaccine movements…The album also features the groovy “Set Your Back on Fire” an underrated Heavy Metal anthem, the speedy Rock’ N Roller  “Red Skull Rock” and the title track that is one of the greatest moments by Tank, that closes emphatically the record. 

Extra mentioning on the stunning producer Nigel Gray (1947 – 30 July 2016) that left space for all instruments to shine without losing any roughness of their debut which was produced by “Fast” Eddie Clarke of Motörhead. Gary was an English record producer which his album credits except Tank’s sophomore LP include Outlandos d’Amour (1978), Reggatta de Blanc (1979), and Zenyatta Mondatta (1980) for the Police, Kaleidoscope (1980) and Juju (1981) for Siouxsie and the Banshees, as well as five albums for Godley & Crème.